Development of a Prosthetic Liner with Active Cooling to Enhance Amputee Comfort

Abstract

Over 2 million people in the United States live with a prosthetic limb. Amputees typically wear liners to provide a layer of padding between the skin and hard plastic prosthetic, however these liners cause overheating. Overheating in the prosthetic interface, or area where the skin meets the prosthetic, can lead to discomfort, poor fit, and ultimately site blistering. A prosthetic liner with embedded active cooling has been developed that will provide up to 1.7°C cooling. The liner is constructed of silicone sheets and tubing, and preliminary testing confirms that 1.7°C cooling is achievable. A path is presented toward a functional cooling prototype and a validation procedure to verify cooling meets the needs of amputees.

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